SEARCH TIP #62: Take note of your glimpses— insights about strengths from Dr. Clifton

13 Aug

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As referenced in prior posts, Dr. Donald O. Clifton identified five indicators that can help you determine if you have strengths which you could promote and apply to a new job. The fourth are glimpses.

Don told the story of a track coach, Bob Timmons, who saw potential in a young runner by seeing a short “glimpse” of performance.

The coach worked with the young runner, helping him build on those glimpses.

The runner, Jim Ryan, eventually became a world-record holder.

There may be times in your past when you’ve experienced a “glimpse”, when you weren’t necessarily at peak performance but were showing moments of success. Glimpses can be built upon and nurtured. Those moments can be highly predictive of work where you could be, eventually, very successful.

Want to use your strengths at work? Think about your glimpses.

The posts for the next couple weeks are inspired by a man who inspired me, Donald O. Clifton.

There are free training videos on the web site of my faith community: https://www.thetablempls.com/jobresources

JOB SEARCH TIP #61: Rapid learning— insights on strengths from Dr. Clifton

12 Aug

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As referenced in prior posts, Dr. Donald O. Clifton identified five indicators that can help you determine if you have strengths which you could promote and apply to a new job.

The third is rapid learning.

Have you noticed there are some tasks for which you seem to “catch on quickly”?

That could be rapid learning.

Have there been new jobs where you were actually ahead of the training?

That could be rapid learning.

Have there been jobs where you’ve helped other new employees who are struggling with tasks you find easy?

That could be rapid learning.

If you’re experiencing rapid learning, you’re well on your way to finding tasks for which you are optimally suited.

Find them.

The posts for the next couple weeks are inspired by a man who inspired me, Donald O. Clifton.

There are free training videos on the web site of my faith community: https://www.thetablempls.com/jobresources

SEARCH TIP #60: Get your “satisfactions”— insights about strengths from Dr. Clifton

11 Aug

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As referenced in prior posts, Dr. Donald O. Clifton identified five indicators that can help you determine if you have strengths which you could promote and apply to a new job.

The second is satisfactions.

So you thought you might like a job or some part of a job (yearnings), and now you’re actually doing the job. The next thing you should look for is a sense of satisfaction.

You may still be new to the role and not feel as successful as you would like, but you can still get a sense that you will find satisfaction in the work.

When have you felt a sense of satisfaction in your work? Has it been a sustained or fleeting feeling? If the former, you may be onto something.

Although more predictive of talent than yearnings, there are still some tasks that we enjoy but ultimately we don’t become exceptional.

I know the Rolling Stones sang about not being able to get any satisfaction, but you can find it in your work.

Search for it.

The posts for the next couple weeks are inspired by a man who inspired me, Donald O. Clifton.

There are free training videos on the web site of my faith community: https://www.thetablempls.com/jobresources

SEARCH TIP #59: Yearnings—insights about strengths from Dr. Clifton

10 Aug

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As referenced in the prior post, Dr. Donald O. Clifton identified five indicators that can help you determine if you have strengths which you could promote and apply to a new job.

The first is yearnings.

We often have a feeling that “I might like that job”—that’s a yearning.

It’s a good place to start to search for your talents, so think about those things for which you have yearned for when it comes to work.

Although yearnings are a good place to start, we often have yearnings for which we may not have the talent. For example, I LOVE to play golf (a yearning), but I’m awful at golf! In this case my yearning is not an indicator of talent.

The inspirational speaker Orison Marden: “When we begin to desire a thing, to yearn for it with all our hearts, we begin to establish relationship with it in proportion to the strength and persistency of our longing and intelligent effort to realize it.”

Yearnings are a start. Think about your yearnings, as they may lead you on a journey to the work that would really speak to you.

The posts for the next couple weeks are inspired by a man who inspired me, Donald O. Clifton.

There are free training videos on the web site of my faith community: https://www.thetablempls.com/jobresources

#career #careercoach #jobhunting #careers #jobsearch #strengths

JOB SEARCH TIP #58: Two weeks of Dr. Clifton starts with a method for identifying your strengths

9 Aug

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In his ground-breaking book “Soar with Your Strengths” my mentor Dr. Donald Clifton (pictured in 1983) identified a hierarchy that was designed to help folks think about what might be their strengths:

  1. YEARNINGS—those things for which we have interest,
  2. SATISFACTIONS—the kind of work you actually enjoy,
  3. RAPID LEANING—times when you learn new parts of a job easily and quickly,
  4. GLIMPSES, when you maybe aren’t excellent, but you are showing glimpses of success, and
  5. TOTAL PERFORMANCE, those roles or tasks where you have achieved excellence.

I’ll speak more about each of this in subsequent posts. You can use these five factors to think about how you can identify your strengths, the talents for which an employer will pay you well to help them contribute to the success of the organization.

You too, can soar with your strengths.

The posts for the next couple weeks are inspired by the man who inspired me, Donald O. Clifton. Regards, Mark

There are free training videos on the web site of my faith community: https://www.thetablempls.com/jobresources

 

JOB SEARCH TIP #57: Volunteer to gain job skills.

9 Aug

Early in my career I was looking for ways to showcase my leadership skills. I had some experience at work, but strengthened my case with volunteer activities.

I wasn’t paid for this work, but that didn’t mean the experience was without value. In one of my volunteer activities I learned a lot of getting a group of people with different ideas to work together and to manage the conflict that naturally arises from the collaboration.

If you have these experiences, highlight them when they help you tell your story.

Don’t have any volunteer experiences? Not to worry. Even in the midst of the pandemic, you can find ways to volunteer and help out.

Importantly, volunteer where you feel you can make a difference and do so because the cause is worthy, and as a benefit you gain some skills as well.

Where I live there are thousands of nonprofits who need help, and I bet where you live there are plenty of good choices.

There are training videos on the web site of my faith community. This content is free: https://www.thetablempls.com/jobresources

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JOB SEARCH TIP #56: If I can fix my vacuum cleaner, you can change your job search mindset.

7 Aug

I’m not mechanically inclined… at all.

But when our vacuum cleaner quit recently, instead of asking for help I sat down, took my time, and figured out what needed to be done.

It wasn’t easy, but rather than saying “that’s something I can’t do”, I changed my mindset.

Researchers have learned that our mindset can impact how we deal with change. Some of us have a “fixed” mindset, and feel we often can’t make changes in our life. Others have more of a “growth” mindset, where we are open to learning and new experiences.

In the job search, a “growth” mindset can be a positive asset.

Some “fixed” mindsets that could hurt your search:

“I don’t know anyone at that company.”

“I don’t have the right qualifications.”

“I could never learn how to network.”

You CAN change, you CAN grow.

Check your mindsets, and then get out there and make this day productive.

Want to learn more about these mindsets? Go to: https://tinyurl.com/y2s4l7m5

There are free training videos on the web site of my faith community. Please pass along: https://www.thetablempls.com/jobresources

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JOB SEARCH TIP #55: Lucky me, I get to take an assessment!

6 Aug

As part of the hiring process you may be asked to complete an assessment by a prospective employer. In some cases these assessments are conducted early in the process, while in others they may one of the final steps.

The objective for the employer is to gain additional insights about whether you will be successful. The quality and use of these assessments varies, and hopefully the prospective employer is acting responsibly in their use.

As a job seeker, here are a few things to keep in mind:

~ Take this seriously. The decision to hire you will weigh, in part, on the results.

~ Don’t worry about what “you think they want you to say”. Answer in a way that is reflective of you.

~ To the degree you can, keep your accomplishments and strengths in mind.

~ Also keep in mind the job for which you are being hired.

Are these assessments perfect? No, but they can helpful to a company in getting a sense of who you are. They are a part of telling your story.

It’s a new day. Let’s make something of it.

There are free training videos on the web site of my faith community: https://www.thetablempls.com/jobresources

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JOB SEARCH TIP #54 The “Chicken Soup for the Soul” author got rejected 144 rejections. Hang in there.

6 Aug

You’ve seen these books, right? There is now a series of “Chicken Soup” books, but that wasn’t always the case. Jack Canfield reportedly got 144 rejection letters before he finally got a yes.

And the rest is publishing history.

I hope you don’t get 144 rejections before you find your job, but rejection is part of the process.

It never feels good.

So what can you do?

  • Ask if an employer who rejected you will offer some feedback, and keep what they say in mind.
  • Ask networking contacts for feedback, including what they know about you and what they know about employers you are targeting.
  • Continue to work your plan, every day, recognizing that you are taking steps that are within your control.
  • If you have difficulties that impact your health, seek help.

There are training videos on the web site of my faith community and a handout. This content is free: https://www.thetablempls.com/jobresources

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JOB SEARCH TIP #53: You can travel two job search tracks.

4 Aug

As a guy who grew up in a railroad town, I learned there was more than one track that can get you where you want to go. When it comes to your job search, you too can have more than one track.

Here are examples of job search tracks:

~ Same job, same industry.

~ Same job, different industry.

~ Different job, same industry.

~ Different job, different industry.

~ Self-employment.

With each of these tracks you would develop a different plan, approach different networking contacts, research different topics, and prepare your communications differently. For example, with “different job, same industry” you might use a functional resume to highlight your strengths, where with “same job, same industry” a more traditional chronological resume might be fine.

You could have two tracks to your job search, and can advance both at the same time.

Determine you goals. Make your plan. Do your homework. Tell your story.

Make it a great day.

There are free training videos on the web site of my faith community: https://www.thetablempls.com/jobresources

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